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About Anne Pringle Burnell February 01, 2018 15:48 1 Comment

Anne Pringle Burnell created and developed the Stronger Seniors™ Chair Exercise DVD Video Programs for older adults and people with disabilities, injuries, or chronic conditions.  


Exercising to Reduce Obesity October 30, 2017 11:46

Obesity is a significant health problem in the United States, affecting close to one-third of all adults. Although genetics can play a role in the likelihood that a person will become obese, the condition occurs when the amount of calories consumed exceeds the amount of calories expended over a long period of time. Excess calories are stored as fat in the body, and with long-term caloric excess, an individual eventually becomes obese. Exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet are ways in which to combat obesity.

Benefits of Regular Exercise
Regular exercise (and proper nutrition) can help reduce body fat as well as protect against chronic diseases associated with obesity. If you are looking for a reason to start an exercise program, listed below are five of the many benefits of regular physical activity.

Exercise lowers risk for chronic diseases Concerned about heart disease? Regular exercise is a proven way to decrease risk for these and other chronic diseases. It will help to prevent or manage high blood pressure. It also raises high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, known as the “good” cholesterol, and lowers low density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol. This combination will decrease the amount of harmful plaques that can buildup on your artery walls and keep blood flowing smoothly. Regular exercise can also help prevent type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and certain cancers.

Exercise improves your mood
Feeling a little edgy? A quick workout will help calm you down! Exercise stimulates chemicals in your brain that make you feel happy and relaxed. It also makes you feel better about yourself and helps reduce feelings of depression and anxiety.

Exercise helps manage weight
It’s a no-brainer. Exercise burns calories. The more you exercise, the easier it is to keep your weight under control. But remember that exercise is not a free pass to eat everything in sight! To burn 100 calories, most people need to walk or run about one mile. And one little chocolate M&M candy contains the amount of calories it would take to run or walk the length of a football field! So be sure not to overestimate the amount of calories you’re burning.

Exercise promotes better sleep
Having a hard time falling and staying asleep? A good night’s sleep can improve your concentration and productivity throughout the day, and exercise might be the key to getting better sleep. It can help you fall asleep faster and sleep deeper.

Exercise can be FUN
Tired of spending your Saturday afternoons watching TV or doing laundry? Looking for an activity that the whole family can enjoy? Get moving! Exercise doesn’t have to be grueling. Take a dancing class, push your kids on the swing, or try something new. Find an activity you enjoy, and have fun with it!

Starting an Exercise Program
For obese persons, the focus of the exercise program should be based on low-intensity aerobic activity with progressively increasing duration. Aerobic exercise provides overall health benefits, including fat loss, an increase in daily energy levels, and reduced risk of health problems. At the beginning of the program, the frequency and duration of the activity is more important than the intensity. Aim for exercising four or five days a week for 30 to 60 minutes. If you were previously sedentary, these sessions can be broken up into three 10-minute sessions, with gradual increases in duration.

In addition to aerobic activity, resistance or weight training can also provide some benefits to overall health. Not only does weight training make you stronger, but it also raises your muscle-to-fat ratio, which increases the amount of calories you burn at rest.

Despite all your inclinations to monitor your weight on the bathroom scale, try to resist focusing on weight loss. The body has a tendency to gain muscle or lean weight initially, so although your body is benefiting from the exercise, the pounds might not drop off right away. Focus on the quality and quantity of the exercise instead.

  • Engage in activity that puts minimal stress on the joints, such as walking, swimming or water exercises, and cycling.
  • Ease into your workout. Start slowly for the first five minutes to give your body time to adjust to the activity.
  • Work at a comfortable pace that allows you to talk without too much difficulty.
  • Focus on increasing duration first, then increasing intensity.
  • Slow down for the last five minutes to allow your body to ease back into its resting state
  • Finish with stretching exercises.

Precautions

  • It is important to gradually increase the duration and intensity of the exercises, while understanding that you will have to build up to longer and more strenuous workouts.
  • Jogging can cause stress on the knees and joints and is generally not recommended for the obese because of risk for injury. Instead, stick to lower impact aerobic activities until you are in better shape.
  • Obese people should be especially careful about heat exhaustion given that they are less able to adapt to temperature changes. Wearing light clothing will allow for better heat exchange while exercising.
  • Hydration is very important for the obese, since they are susceptible to dehydration. Be sure to drink fluids frequently before, during, and after exercise.
  • Slow down or stop if you experience chest pains, shortness of breath, palpitations, nausea, pain in the neck or jaw, or major muscle or joint pain.

Integrate physical activity into daily activity:

  • Take the stairs.
  • Park farther from the door.
  • Take a short walk at lunch.
  • Turn off the TV.
  • Take walk breaks from work.
  • Wear a pedometer for monitoring your activity.

People don’t just have time to exercise…they MAKE time to exercise. Be in control of your life. Make exercise a part of your day, everyday!

 

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise DVD Videos


Medicare panel gives low vote of confidence to weight-loss treatments August 31, 2017 15:53

A panel that advises the CMS on Medicare coverage decisions said there wasn't enough information available on whether weight-loss surgeries and devices are beneficial for the program's enrollees, making it unlikely Medicare will expand coverage for more of the treatments. 

The panel overall voiced confidence that there was evidence that weight-loss surgeries such as gastric bypass, lap bands and gastric sleeve surgeries were helpful in treating obese patients, but said the benefits for individuals 65 and older are still unclear. 

Hospitals are now reimbursed between $10,000 and $17,000 by Medicare for weight-loss surgeries and physicians on average receive $1,500.

Medicare now covers weight-loss surgery for only certain beneficiaries who have a body mass index of 35 or greater and at least one co-morbidity such as high blood pressure or diabetes. 

The patient also has to prove that they participated in at least one physician-supervised program in which they failed to lose weight.

Clinicians that specialize in weight loss estimate that about 2 million Medicare beneficiaries are eligible for the surgeries now. They hoped that CMS would expand the coverage to people with a BMI as low as 30, which would make an additional 1 million enrollees eligible.

There is evidence that people with a lower BMI number have greater long-term health benefits than those that have a higher one, as they tend to have fewer or less severe chronic illnesses, according to Dr. John Morton, chief of bariatric and minimally invasive surgery at Stanford School of Medicine.

If Medicare were to lower the eligible BMI for surgery, health insurance companies would likely follow suit, which could mean millions more could become eligible for coverage for weight-loss procedures.

As things are now, most insurance companies cover weight-loss surgeries for people with BMIs 40 or greater, or a BMI of 35 if there are significant medical problems associated with that person's weight, such as diabetes or heart disease.

"Medicare coverage decisions are very influential," Morton said. "If CMS' sneezes, the rest of insurers get a cold."

While it wasn't a specific voting question, several panelists mentioned they were especially unsure what clinical benefit gastric balloons provided.

"The evidence I heard today was not compelling," said Dr. Marcel Salive, panel member and health scientist administrator in the National Institute of Health's Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

Doctors say these devices are a low-risk alternative for patients whose health is too frail for surgeries. 

The balloons are inserted into the stomach through an endoscopic procedure. A doctor fills the balloon with saline solution to create a feeling of fullness, so patients lose the urge to overeat. After six months, it's deflated and removed. 

The FDA approved balloons from two different companies in 2015, but no insurers cover their use. On average, the total cost of the gastric balloon procedure is $8,150.


Do You Have an Exercise Buddy? August 28, 2017 08:37

Seniors program shows the benefits of socializing and exercise....

A seniors program that combines exercise and socializing for people in the early stages of dementia and their care partners is taking place weekly at the Maple Ridge Seniors Activity Centre.

Minds in Motion is currently being offered as part of the Alzheimer Society of B.C. First Link dementia support to create an opportunity for people with dementia and their care partners to connect with others, make new friends and have fun.

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise

First started in Victoria in 2009, the program made its way to Maple Ridge a year and a half ago.  The reason it was started, explained Kate Turnbull, Minds in Motion coordinator with the Alzheimer Society of B.C., is that there was a gap in programming for people with dementia.

“There is lots of programming that is for the person with dementia and there is programming for care givers. But not a lot that brings both together. That was the big thing,” said Turnbull.

“It’s evolved over time to be more specifically for people in the early stages of dementia,” she said.

The program starts off with 45 minutes of light exercise followed by another 45 minutes of social time.

Lori Briggs, B.C. Parks and Recreation Association supervisor of fitness leaders, heads up the fitness portion.

Briggs has specialized in seniors fitness for the last 35 years and has worked with a variety of groups including people with Parkinson’s, or stroke recovery and Osteofit.

For Minds in Motion, the exercises that are not any different than a normal seniors fitness class, it is Briggs’ patience and knowledge of dementia that makes the class unique.

If a person with dementia is getting confused she may stop the exercise early, if she sees someone getting frustrated or not being able to understand a movement, she will switch to another exercise.

Briggs has been trained by the Alzheimer Society of B.C. to recognize symptoms of dementia. She knows how to introduce exercises and is more aware about what might fluster somebody or make them more agitated.

If Briggs sees somebody kind of daydreaming and in their own zone she will say their name and suggest they try the activity being performed. If somebody doesn’t change legs or arms when they are doing an exercise she will make a suggestion that they try the other leg and if they don’t she moves on. If an activity is frustrating for an individual she will change the exercise completely for the whole group.

“I never say right or left I just say let’s take our leg and whatever leg they pick up and start with is fine with me,” said Briggs in a soft, calm voice, adding that the most important thing is that the participants feel successful.

“We want them to feel less stressed and just feel like they are part of the group and accepted. That is really important,” she continued.

Another thing Briggs does to make the participants feel comfortable is she always lets them know that if they are having a good day they can do whatever they can and if they are having an off day that it’s okay to stop when ever they want.

“It makes them feel like I don’t have to do this if I don’t want to,” said Briggs.

Briggs works the muscles that strengthen the core of an individual.

“What I try to teach are exercises that are designed to improve quality of life as well as balance and agility. Which is preventing falls and those kind of things,” she explained.

She teaches both sitting standing exercises and uses resistance bands and different sized balls for agility games such as throwing them up in the air and catching them or passing a ball around a circle.

During social time participants play a variety of games like Jenga, where you remove blocks from a tower without it falling over, the card game UNO, trivia and sometimes even ping pong.

Sometimes the games are modified slightly if there are persons in the group that are finding the games too challenging.

“Again with social time it is really about making that person feel successful, making them feel like a part of the group,” said Turnbull.

”In UNO there are all sorts of cards that do different things other than just the numbers and the colours. If I have somebody who is really struggling I will take those cards out so the game is more simplified,” she said.

Turnbull will also play a reminiscent activity with the group where she will ask them if, for example, they remember a time without car seats.

”For people with dementia the memories that normally go first are the more short term memories whereas they tend to keep their long term memory stuff from when they were kids longer,” said Turnbull.

“So those reminiscent games they tend to enjoy them because they have those memories from when their kids were young or from when they were kids themselves,” she said.

One of the great things about this program is everyone has training in how to deal with people who have dementia.

Also, Turnbull added, the care partner is also connecting with people in the same situation as themselves.

”There is a feeling of support. Even though it is not a support group, they are getting a bit of support from having other people around them,” said Turnbull.

Even if a participant does not want to participate in the activities they are also welcome to enjoy the refreshments and chat with other people.

Briggs always stays until the very end of the class even though she could leave after the exercise portion.

”I find it’s important for me so that I have that connection with them as well because I think it’s part of knowing the person’s past. I just enjoy it,” she said.

Minds in Motion takes place from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Friday except for holidays at the Maple Ridge Seniors Activity Centre, 12150 224 Street.


Prevalence of Obesity and Diabetes in the US 1994-2004 June 30, 2017 15:54

The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention reported that in 2009-10, an estimated 68% of the U.S. Population was considered obese or overweight.

The high prevalence of obesity is a concern, because it increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease.


Better Health - Diet vs. Exercise - Part 3 February 20, 2017 16:28

Seniors enjoying their healthy longevity

An Age Old Opinion on Exercise October 21, 2016 16:41

“All parts of the body if used in moderation and exercised in labors to which each is accustomed, become thereby healthy and well developed, and age slowly; but if unused and left idle, they become liable to disease, defective in growth, and age quickly.” –            Hippocrates    

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program


Best Exercises for Functional Longevity October 21, 2016 15:42

Let’s face it.  Quantity without quality is no fun.  Quality without quantity is a ripoff. You really need both quality and quantity to get the most out of retirement years.  You need functional longevity.

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program


Medicare Can Pay for Wellness Checkups. Get One! October 13, 2016 12:05

If you’ve had Part B for longer than 12 months, you can get a yearly “Wellness” visit to develop or update a personalized plan to prevent disease or disability based on your current health and risk factors. This visit is covered once every 12 months.

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program


The Art Of Aging October 10, 2016 10:00

the Centre’s research shows a positive relationship between participation in the creative and performing arts and healthy aging. As a health promotion strategy, arts programs get a standing ovation. The physical and psychosocial benefits people gain include increased fitness, life satisfaction, and self-confidence.

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program


Poststroke exercise – the benefits September 20, 2016 13:06

This review focuses on the benefits of both exercise and cognitive training for stroke patients.

Primarily, increased physical activity had several benefits for stroke patients including weight control, reduced risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer and depression.

The authors identified two types of exercise used in post-stroke training; aerobic exercise (AE) to improve cardiovascular fitness and resistance exercise (RE) to improve muscle strength.

Stronger Seniors Chair Exercise Program